" Somewhere in my files I have a copy of the DC-10 manual for a PC sim ("DC-10" ?) with no graphics other than a character-based flat 'cockpit' of crude gauges.

It was for IBM PC and allowed flights from England to Holland. I do not find it mentioned in the relevant wikipedia articles or MSFS history pages I will try to dig the copy out - it was widely pirated in the mid-80's, I believe. The key-combinations were arcane ( I learned to fly by NDB with no manual ). If you landed, OK, your flight ended.

Most often I (reportedly) missed the runway. After this, seeing Flight Simulator on a Mac was quite an eye-opener ... I had planned to run it on a 256 Kb 'Hyperion' with a tiny amber CRT ( no hard drive ). I may have DC10 on a 5 1/4" floppy in storage.

To quote http://www.textfiles.com/games/REVIEWS/orbiter.rev "ORBITER is a space shuttle simulation from PC Services, Digital Illusions, and Spectrum HoloByte." As I recall, this and 'Falcon AT' were among the first PC games to detect and use the 287 chip for floating-point calculations at a time when those chips went into an optional socket ( if the socket was even present on the board) "

Robert Shiplett
Thu 23 Nov 2006