Enemy Engaged Apache vs. Havoc

A living environment - An eye for detail: Lighting and atmospherics

The graphics techniques used in Apache Havoc make the most of the limitations of the medium to create a convincing illusion of reality.
This really is A R T with a capital A!

The graphics techniques used in Apache Havoc make the most of the limitations of the medium to create a convincing illusion of reality.
Very subtle use of lighting cues and a keen artist - programmer or two give you an incredible illusion of depth in Apache Havoc. Take this picture for example. It's a simple shot taken out the right hand side of a Mi-28N Havoc cockpit on a rainy afternoon.
Let's list the lighting cues starting from nearest to furthest.
Starting at bottom right the briliant sheen and distinct shadows of the metal work makes it look very close. It is right next to you. Up a little and you can see the lettering of the helmet-mounted display, with no depth and apparently superimposed on top of the image. Actual head-up-displays are generally focussed on infinity but this is the best solution for a monitor representation.
Above the AIR RDR text you can see blurred droplets of rain on the glass. So we already have established two layers - the helmet display and the glass/cockpit.
In the centre of the image you can see rain droplets moving at 45 degrees from the vertical - left top right. This establishes a 3rd space - that OUTSIDE the cockpit.
Looking at the terrain and starting at bottom left - follow the image up and see how the sunlight is reflected in different ways of the foliage.
These subtle cues vary with the topography - hills cast shadows - and with the time of day.
The weather also affects the quality of light.
Finally, casting our eyes to the top right we can see a pinkish horizon. On wide expanses the horizon fades very convincingly.
So next time you're motoring about in your combat helo - do stop and smell the (graphical) roses, won't you!